SALSA

Saving Lives, Staying Active

SAving Lives Staying Active (SALSA) is an award winning, community based study designed to test an innovative health intervention using web resources and salsa dancing to promote physical activity and improve dietary habits in women of color. The SALSA study received the award for Outstanding Achievement for a Community Program from the Texas Council for Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke in 2009. The purposes of the study are to determine (1) the feasibility of an internet-based intervention and (2) whether a salsa dance intervention is effective for promoting physical activity sufficient to meet recommendations, and (3) whether an internet intervention to promote fruit and vegetable consumption increases fruit and vegetable consumption. Participants acheived sufficient intensity physical activity during salsa dancing to meet moderate to vigorous physical activity recommended levels. Findings also indicate participants increased their weekly leisure-time physical activity, improved their body satisfaction, and social support while reducing blood pressure. Participants enjoyed both salsa dancing and visiting the website.

Related Publications and Abstracts

Lee RE, Mama SK, Medina AV, Edwards RO, McNeill LH. SAving Lives Staying Active: SALSA to promote physical activity and healthy eating. Journal of Obesity; 2011, 2011:436509.

Lee RE, Mama SK, Medina AV, Edwards RO, McNeill LH. Latin Dance to Increase Physical Activity, The SALSA Study. Poster presented at the 3rd International Conference on Community Psychology, Puebla, Mexico. June 3, 2010.

Mama SK, Medina AV, Edwards RO, McNeill L, Lee RE. Improving Psychological and Physical Health in Women of Color via Salsa Dancing. International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Abstract Submissions. 2010; 6(1):Article 18.

Dinh JN, Sunseri CP, Mama SK, Medina AV, Lee RE, McNeill L. Internet-based Intervention to Improve Dietary Habits in Women of Color: SAving Lives Staying Active (SALSA). International Journal of Exercise Science: Conference Abstract Submissions. 2010; 6(1):Article 25.

Mama SK, Medina AV, Edwards RO, McNeill L, Lee RE. A Culturally Friendly Web-based Hybrid Intervention to Prevent Obesity: The SALSA Study. Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2010;39(Supplement):s89.